Healthy Peterborough

Stop Smoking

Stoptober returns!

Did you know that if you stop smoking for 28 days you're five times more likely to stop for good?

Stoptober is the biggest stop smoking event of the year. Stoptober is a pledge to not smoke during 28 days of October. It has driven over 1 million quit attempts to date and is the biggest mass quit attempt in the country.

Why not join all the people who have succeeded in becoming smokefree and join in this year's challenge.

The Healthy Peterborough Lifestyle Service provides a free and confidential stop smoking service with fully qualified advisors giving practical help and support for your quitting journey. They can advise you of all the treatments out there that can give you the extra support you need to kick the habit for good. Come along to one of the roadshows listed below for face to face advice.

  • Tuesday 11th September 10am - 2pm, Peterborough Regional College
  • Wednesday 12th September 10am - 2pm, Peterborough Regional College
  • Thursday 27th September 9am - 5pm,  Can do Area, Stoptober Van - Millfield
  • Friday 28th September 10am - 12pm, Dogsthorpe Fire Station
  • Friday 28th September 12:30pm - 3pm,Faizan E Medina Mosque
  • Saturday 29th September 9am - 5pm Town hall
  • Wednesday 17th October 11am - 4pm, Peterborough City Hospital (Atrium)

Alternatively contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 5655.

Everyone’s quitting journey is different, but with Stoptober, you won’t be on your own. Join the thousands quitting smoking with Stoptober and get all the support you need to help you on your quit jouney.

There a lots of ways to quit and Stoptober can help you choose what works for you. You can quit using medication (including nicotine replacement therapies such as patches and gum) or e-cigarettes. Stoptober offers a range of free support to help you including an app, daily emails, Facebook Messenger and lots of encouragement from the Stoptober online community on Facebook. In addition, you can get expert face-to-face advice from local stop smoking services.

Those who use stop smoking aids and who get face-to-face support from their local stop smoking service are up to four times more likely to quit successfully.

Stopping smoking is the best thing you can do for your health and the health of those around you. If you can make it to 28 days smokefree, you’re 5 times more likely to stay quit for good. 

Visit our Stop Smoking pages for more advice.

Where to find a smoking clinic near you?

Healthy Peterborough Smokefree Service

We have a wide range of specialist smokefree clinics across Peterborough, giving you the opportunity to access one near to your home or workplace. We provide free, confidential, practical help and support from fully qualified instructors, when you are ready to stop. 

Sessions are weekly for up to 12 weeks, and you will receive 1:1 support alongside advice on the most suitable medications available which will give you the best chance to quit permanently.

See below for clinics located within a GP practice which you can contact directly:

GP Practices with Smokefree clinics

If your GP practice is not on the list, we also have smokefree clinics located at a number of community settings which are open to all:

Community Smokefree clinics

To access these clinics please phone our local number on 01733 894540 and we will happily make you an appointment which is convenient to you.

 

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact the Healthy Peterborough service on 01733 894540, or national freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 



Support & Useful Links - Smoking

Your FREE local stop smoking service

Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with the help of your local stop smoking service?

Services staffed by NCSCT trained stop smoking advisors are available all over the city, including GP Practices, Peterborough City Hospital, community settings, and some local pharmacies. They provide one-to-one support for up to 12 weeks while you work towards your quit date.

Find your nearest NHS Stop Smoking Service by calling the Healthy Peterborough Service locally on 01733 894540, or nationally on 0800 376 56 55 to speak to a trained advisor. Alternatively, email healthy.peterborough@nhs.net.

 
 

Talk to your GP

Many people don't realise that their GP can help them quit smoking. Your doctor can support you by referring you to a specialised 'stop smoking' clinic where you will be prescribed nicotine replacement therapy such as patches and gum, or stop smoking medication such as Champix. You will also be offered one to one behavioral support to help deal with your cravings.

Visit your local pharmacy

Stop smoking services are also on offer at many pharmacies as part of local NHS Stop Smoking Services. As well as getting nicotine replacement therapy, such as nicotine gum or patches, or other stop-smoking medication, you'll meet with your specialist smoking advisor to discuss your progress. Please enquire at your local pharmacy to see if they provide stop smoking advice.

Peterborough pharmacies currently providing a Stop Smoking Service (this information may change):

Rowlands Pharmacy - Craig St

Boots Pharmacy - Bretton Centre

Boots Pharmacy - Eye

Boots Pharmacy - Hampton

Boots Pharmacy - Queensgate

Botolph Pharmacy

City Pharmacy

Co-op Pharmacy - Paston

Graham Young Chemist

Lloyds Pharmacy - Bushfield

MI Pharmacy Werrington

Netherton Pharmacy

Newborough Pharmacy

Sainsburys Pharmacy - Bretton

Sainsburys Pharmacy - Oxney Road

West town Chemist

 


Useful links

Millions of people have used Smokefree support to help them stop smoking. The following links provide information about the harms of smoking, the benefits of quitting and the support to help you, from app and tools to Quit Kits to face-to-face guidance.

      

 

                              

10 self-help tips to stop smoking

If you want to stop smoking, you can make small changes to your lifestyle that may help you resist the temptation to light up.

1. Think positive

You might have tried to quit smoking before and not managed it, but don't let that put you off. Look back at the things your experience has taught you and think about how you're really going to do it this time.

2. Make a plan to quit smoking

Make a promise, set a date and stick to it. Sticking to the 'not a drag' rule can really help. Whenever you find yourself in difficulty say to yourself, "I will not have even a single drag" and stick with this until the cravings pass.

Think ahead to times where it might be difficult - a party for instance - and plan your actions and escape routes in advance.

3. Consider your diet

Is your after-dinner cigarette your favourite? A US study revealed that some foods, including meat, make cigarettes more satisfying. Others, including cheese, fruit and vegetables, make cigarettes taste terrible. So swap your usual steak or burger for a veggie pizza instead.  

4. Change your drink

The same study looked at drinks. Fizzy drinks, alcohol, cola, tea and coffee all make cigarettes taste better. So when you're out, drink more water and juice. Some people find simply changing their drink (for example, switching from wine to a vodka and tomato juice) affects their need to reach for a cigarette.

5. Identify when you crave cigarettes

A craving can last five minutes. Before you give up, make a list of five-minute strategies. For example, you could leave the party for a minute, dance, or go to the bar. And think about this: the combination of smoking and drinking raises your risk of mouth cancer by 38 times. 

6. Get moving

A review of scientific studies has proved exercise – even a five-minute walk or stretch – cuts cravings and may help your brain produce anti-craving chemicals.

7. Make non-smoking friends

When you're at a party, stick with the non-smokers. "When you look at the smokers, don't envy them," says Louise, 52, an ex-smoker. "Think of what they're doing as a bit strange – lighting a small white tube and breathing in smoke."

8. Keep your hands and mouth busy

Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can double your chances of success.

As well as patches, there are tablets, lozenges, gum and a nasal spray. And if you like holding a cigarette, there are handheld products like the inhalator. There are also e-cigarettes.

When you're out, try putting your drink in the hand that usually holds a cigarette, or drink from a straw to keep your mouth busy. 

9. Make a list of reasons to quit

Keep reminding yourself why you made the decision to give up. Make a list of the reasons and read it when you need support. Ex-smoker Chris, 28, says: "I used to take a picture of my baby daughter with me when I went out. If I was tempted, I'd look at that."

10. Quit together

If friends or family members want to give up too, suggest to them that you give up together.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

 

Smokefree app

The NHS Smokefree app can help you stop smoking by providing daily support and motivation. If you stay smokefree for the 4-week programme you’re up to five times more likely to stay quit for good.

Join the thousands who have already quit with our support. There's lots of other free support on offer – from emails, SMS and texts – so you can choose the support that's right for you.

Available from the Apple app store and Android Google Play store

5 benefits of quitting

1. Quit smoking to live longer

Half of all long-term smokers die early from smoking-related diseases, including heart disease, lung cancer and chronic bronchitis.

Men who quit smoking by the age of 30 add 10 years to their life. People who kick the habit at 60 add three years to their life.

In other words, it's never too late to benefit from stopping. Being smoke-free not only adds years to your life, but also greatly improves your chances of a disease-free, mobile, happier old age.

2. Stopping smoking lets you breathe more easily

People breathe more easily and cough less when they give up smoking because their lung capacity improves by up to 10% within nine months.  

In your 20s and 30s, the effect of smoking on your lung capacity may not be noticeable until you go for a run, but lung capacity naturally diminishes with age.

In later years, having maximum lung capacity can mean the difference between having an active, healthy old age and wheezing when you go for a walk or climb the stairs.

3. Stop smoking gives you more energy

Within 2 to 12 weeks of stopping smoking your blood circulation improves. This makes all physical activity, including walking and running, much easier.

You will also give a boost to your immune system, making it easier to fight off colds and flu. The increase in oxygen in the body can also reduce tiredness and the likelihood of headaches.

4. Ditch the cigarettes and feel less stressed

The withdrawal from nicotine between cigarettes can heighten feelings of stress. As the stress of withdrawal feels the same as other stresses, it's easy to confuse normal stress with nicotine withdrawal.  So, it can seem like smoking is reducing other stresses whereas this is not the case.

In fact, scientific studies show people's stress levels are lower after they stop smoking.

If you're finding that you are prone to stress, then replacing smoking with a healthier, better way of dealing with stress can give you some real benefits. 

5. A smoke-free homes protects your loved ones

By stopping smoking, you'll be protecting the health of your non-smoking friends and family, too.

Breathing in secondhand smoke increases the risk of lung cancer, heart disease and stroke. In children it doubles the risk of getting chest illnesses, including pneumonia, ear infections, wheezing and asthma.

They also have three times the risk of getting lung cancer in later life compared with children who live with non-smokers.

 

Support and Useful Links

 

What are the health risks of smoking?

Smoking is one of the biggest causes of death and illness in the UK.

Every year around 100,000 people in the UK die from smoking, with many more living with debilitating smoking-related illnesses.

Smoking increases your risk of developing more than 50 serious health conditions. Some may be fatal and others can cause irreversible long-term damage to your health.

You can become ill:

  • if you smoke yourself
  • through other people's smoke (passive smoking)

Smoking health risks

Smoking causes about 90% of lung cancers. It also causes cancer in many other parts of the body, including the:

  • mouth
  • lips
  • throat
  • voice box (larynx)
  • oesophagus (the tube between your mouth and stomach)
  • bladder
  • kidney
  • liver
  • stomach
  • pancreas

Smoking damages your heart and your blood circulation, increasing your risk of developing conditions such as:

Smoking also damages your lungs, leading to conditions such as:

Smoking can also worsen or prolong the symptoms of respiratory conditions such as asthma, or respiratory tract infections such as the common cold.

In men, smoking can cause impotence because it limits the blood supply to the penis. It can also reduce the fertility of both men and women.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

  

Smoking and Cancer

Stopping smoking is one of the best ways to reduce your risk of cancer. Smoking accounts for more than 1 in 4 UK cancer deaths and more than 4 in 5 cases of lung cancer. Lung cancer survival is one of the lowest of all cancers, and is the most common cause of cancer death in the UK. Smoking causes at least 14 types of cancer as well as heart disease and various lung diseases. The good news is that many of these deaths are preventable, by giving up smoking. Speak to your GP or pharmacist, or visit the Healthy Peterborough smoking pages for information on local support to give you the best possible chance of quitting.

Many of the chemicals found in cigarettes have been shown to cause DNA damage with further chemicals interfering with the body’s ability to repair this damage. Research has shown that for every 15 cigarettes smoked there is a DNA change which could cause a cell to become cancerous. This is why it’s better to give up smoking sooner rather than later.

There are real benefits to stopping:

  • You will save money - the average smoker has 13 cigarettes a day, which works out as 364 cigarettes a month. That's £1,696 a year that you could be saving by not smoking! Try the NHS cost calculator to work out how much you could save if you give up smoking. 
  • Your breathing and general fitness will improve.
  • The appearance of your skin and teeth will improve.
  • Your fertility levels will improve, along with your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and baby.

Find out how quickly your body responds when you give up smoking.

There’s no such thing as a safe way to use tobacco. Filters and low-tar cigarettes make little difference – your lung cancer risk is not lower compared to smokers of average cigarettes. This may be because smokers tend to change the way they smoke in order to satisfy their nicotine craving, for example by taking bigger puffs or smoking more cigarettes.

The serious damaging effects of smoking cannot be cancelled out by leading an otherwise healthy lifestyle, like keeping fit and eating healthily. The best way for smokers to reduce their risk of cancer, and improve their overall health, is to stop smoking completely. How you chose to quit is up to you but prescription medication and support from a specialist at your local stop smoking service gives you the best possible chance of stopping successfully.

Using e-cigarettes to stop smoking

Over recent years, e-cigarettes have become a very popular stop smoking aid in the UK. Evidence is still developing on how effective they are, but many people have found them helpful for quitting.

An electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device that allows you to inhale nicotine without most of the harmful effects of smoking.

E-cigarettes work by heating and creating a vapour from a solution that typically contains nicotine; a thick, colourless liquid called propylene glycol and/or glycerine; and flavourings. As there is no burning involved, there is no smoke.

Will e-cigarettes help me stop smoking?

Research shows that e-cigarettes can help you give up smoking. If you want to use an e-cigarette to help you quit, you’ll give yourself the best chance if you speak to our local stop smoking service. In the year up to April 2015, two out of three people who used e-cigarettes in combination with the local stop smoking service quit smoking successfully.

E-cigarettes on prescription

Currently, there are no e-cigarettes on the market that are licensed as medicines, which means they are not available on prescription from the NHS. Once medicinally licensed e-cigarette products come onto the market, GPs and stop smoking services will be able to prescribe them alongside other stop smoking medicines.

Read about other stop smoking treatments.

Are e-cigarettes safe?

E-cigarettes do not produce tar and carbon monoxide – two of the main toxins in conventional cigarette smoke. The vapour from e-cigarettes has been found to contain some potentially harmful chemicals also found in cigarette smoke, but at much lower levels.

E-cigarettes are still fairly new and we won’t have a full picture on their safety until they have been in use for many years. However, according to current evidence on e-cigarettes, they carry a fraction of the risk of cigarettes.

New rules for e-cigarettes and their refill containers came into effect in the UK in 2016. These rules ensure that there are minimum standards for the safety and quality of all e-cigarettes and refill containers.

There are two types of safety concerns associated with e-cigarettes:

  • a fault with the e-cigarette device that could make it unsafe to use
  • side effects to your health caused by using your e-cigarette

 

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

 

Stop smoking treatments

If you want to stop smoking, several different treatments are available from shops, pharmacies and on prescription to help you beat your addiction and reduce withdrawal symptoms.

The main options are: 

  • Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)
  • Varenicline (Champix)
  • Bupropion (Zyban)
  • E-cigarettes

The best treatment for you will depend on your personal preference, your age, whether you're pregnant or breastfeeding and any medical conditions you have. Speak to your GP or an NHS stop smoking adviser for advice.

Research has shown that all these methods can be effective. Importantly, evidence shows that they are most effective if used alongside support from your local stop smoking service.

The treatments available are outlined below. You can also read a summary of the pros and cons of stop smoking treatments, allowing you to compare your options.

Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)

The main reason that people smoke is because they are addicted to nicotine. NRT is a medication that provides you with a low level of nicotine, without the tar, carbon monoxide and other poisonous chemicals present in tobacco smoke. It can help reduce unpleasant withdrawal effects, such as bad moods and cravings, which may occur when you stop smoking.

Where to get it and how to use it:

NRT can be bought from pharmacies and some shops. It's also available on prescription from a doctor or NHS stop smoking service.

It's available as:

  • skin patches
  • chewing gum
  • inhalators (which look like plastic cigarettes)
  • tablets, oral strips and lozenges
  • nasal and mouth spray

Patches release nicotine slowly. Some are worn all the time and some should be taken off at night. Inhalators, gum and sprays act more quickly and may be better for alleviating cravings. There's no evidence that any single type of NRT is more effective than another. But there is good evidence to show that using a combination of NRT is more effective than using a single product.

Often the best way to use NRT is to combine a patch with a faster acting form such as gum, inhalator or nasal spray.  Treatment with NRT usually lasts 8-12 weeks, before you gradually reduce the dose and eventually stop.

Who can use it

Most people are able to use NRT, including:

  • adults and children over 12 years of age – although children under 18 shouldn't use the lozenges without getting medical advice first
  • pregnant women – your doctor may suggest NRT if they think it would help you quit
  • breastfeeding women – your doctor can advise you how to do this safely

Always read the packet or leaflet before using NRT to check whether it's suitable for you.  Sometimes it may be advisable to get medical advice first, for example if you have kidney or liver problems, or you've recently had a heart attack or stroke.

Possible side effects

Side effects of NRT can include:

  • skin irritation when using patches
  • irritation of nose, throat or eyes when using a nasal spray
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia), sometimes with vivid dreams
  • an upset stomach
  • dizziness
  • headaches

Any side effects are usually mild. But if they're particularly troublesome, contact your GP as the dose or type of NRT may need to be changed.

 

Varenicline (Champix)

Varenicline (brand name Champix) is a medication that works in two ways. It reduces cravings for nicotine like NRT, but it also blocks the rewarding and reinforcing effects of smoking. Evidence suggests it's the most effective medication for helping people stop smoking.

Where to get it and how to use it

Varenicline is only available on prescription, so you'll usually need to see your GP or contact an NHS stop smoking service to get it. It's taken as one to two tablets a day. You should start taking it a week or two before you try to quit. A course of treatment usually lasts around 12 weeks, but it can be continued for longer if necessary.

Who can use it

Varenicline is safe for most people to take, although there are some situations when it's not recommended. For example, it's not suitable for:

  • children under 18 years of age
  • women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • people with severe kidney problems

Possible side effects

Side effects of varenicline can include:

  • feeling and being sick
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia), sometimes with vivid dreams
  • dry mouth
  • constipation or diarrhoea
  • headaches
  • drowsiness
  • dizziness

Speak to your GP if you experience any troublesome side effects.

 

Bupropion (Zyban)

Bupropion (brand name Zyban) is a medication originally used to treat depression, but it has since been found to help people quit smoking. It's not clear exactly how it works, but it's thought to have an effect on the parts of the brain involved in addictive behaviour.

Where to get it and how to use it

Bupropion is only available on prescription, so you'll usually need to see your GP or contact an NHS stop smoking service to get it. It's taken as one to two tablets a day. You should start taking it a week or two before you try to quit. A course of treatment usually lasts around seven to nine weeks.

Who can use it

Bupropion is safe for most people to take, although there are some situations when it's not recommended. For example, it's not suitable for:

  • children under 18 years of age
  • women who are pregnant or breastfeeding
  • people with epilepsy, bipolar disorder or eating disorders

Possible side effects 

Side effects of bupropion can include:

  • dry mouth 
  • difficulty sleeping (insomnia)
  • headaches
  • feeling and being sick
  • constipation
  • difficulty concentrating
  • dizziness

Speak to your GP if you experience any troublesome side effects.

E-cigarettes

An e-cigarette is an electronic device that delivers nicotine in a vapour. This allows you to inhale nicotine without most of the harmful effects of smoking, as the vapour contains no tar or carbon monoxide.

Research has found that e-cigarettes can help you give up smoking, so you may want to try them rather than the medications listed above. As with other approaches, they're most effective if used with support from an NHS stop smoking service.

There are no e-cigarettes currently available on prescription. But once medicinally licensed e-cigarette products become available, GPs and stop smoking services will be able to prescribe them.

For now, if you want to use an e-cigarette to help you quit, you'll have to buy one. Costs of e-cigarettes can vary, but generally they're much cheaper than cigarettes.

Read more about e-cigarettes.

 

Stopping smoking improves fertility

Non-smokers find it easier to get pregnant. Quitting smoking improves the lining of the womb and can make men's sperm more potent.

Becoming a non-smoker increases the possibility of conceiving through IVF, and reduces the likelihood of having a miscarriage.

Most importantly, it improves the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.

Read more about how to protect your fertility.

 

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

Quitting smoking leads to better sex

Stopping smoking improves the body's blood flow so improves sensitivity.

Men who stop smoking may get better erections. Women may find their orgasms improve and they become aroused more easily.

It's also been found that non-smokers are three times more appealing to prospective partners than smokers.

Find out more tips for having good sex

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

Ditch the cigarettes and feel less stressed

The withdrawal from nicotine between cigarettes can heighten feelings of stress. As the stress of withdrawal feels the same as other stresses, it's easy to confuse normal stress with nicotine withdrawal.  So, it can seem like smoking is reducing other stresses whereas this is not the case.

In fact, scientific studies show people's stress levels are lower after they stop smoking.

If you're finding that you are prone to stress, then replacing smoking with a healthier, better way of dealing with stress can give you some real benefits.

Read our top 10 stress busters to find out more.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

Stop smoking in pregnancy

Protecting your baby from tobacco smoke is one of the best things you can do to give your child a healthy start in life. It's never too late to stop smoking. Every cigarette you smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals, so smoking when you are pregnant harms your unborn baby. Cigarettes can restrict the essential oxygen supply to your baby, so their heart has to beat harder every time you smoke. 

Benefits of stopping smoking in pregnancy

Stopping smoking will benefit both you and your baby immediately. Harmful gases like carbon monoxide and other damaging chemicals will clear from your body. When you stop smoking:

  • you will have fewer complications in pregnancy
  • you are more likely to have a healthier pregnancy and a healthier baby
  • you will reduce the risk of stillbirth
  • you will cope better with the birth
  • your baby is less likely to be born too early and have to face the additional breathing, feeding and health problems that often go with being premature
  • your baby is less likely to be born underweight: babies of women who smoke are, on average, 200g (about 8oz) lighter than other babies, which can cause problems during and after labour, for example they are more likely to have a problem keeping warm and are more prone to infection
  • you will reduce the risk of cot death, also called sudden infant death (find out about reducing the risk of cot death)

Stopping smoking will also benefit your baby later in life. Children whose parents smoke are more likely to suffer from asthma and other more serious illnesses that may need hospital treatment.

 

New specialist Smokefree Clinic for pregnant women and family members
 
 
WHEN:    Every Wednesday from 9-1pm
WHERE:  Peterborough City Hospital, Ante-natal Department
 
Ring Freephone 0800 376 5655 to book your appointment
 
Remember you are 4 times more likely to give up with 1:1 support and medication and Nicotine Replacement Theraphy (NRT) is free during pregnancy
 
 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

Passive smoking: protect your family and friends

Secondhand smoke is dangerous, especially for children. The best way to protect loved ones is to quit smoking. At the very least, make sure you have a smokefree home and car.

When you smoke a cigarette (or roll-up, pipe or cigar), most of the smoke doesn't go into your lungs, it goes into the air around you where anyone nearby can breathe it in. Most secondhand smoke is invisible and odourless, so no matter how careful you think you're being, people around you still breathe in the harmful poisons.

How to protect against secondhand smoke

The only surefire way to protect your friends and family from secondhand smoke is to keep the environment around them smoke free.

The best way to do that is to quit smoking completely. If you're not ready to quit, make every effort to keep your cigarette smoke away from other people and never smoke indoors or in the car.

  • Always smoke outside
  • Ask your visitors to smoke outside
  • Don't smoke in the car or allow anyone else to

Children and passive smoking

Passive smoking is especially harmful for children as they have less well-developed airways, lungs and immune systems.

It's estimated that more than one in five children in the UK live in a household where at least one person smokes and, as a result, they're more likely to develop:

To protect children, there is a new ban on smoking in cars and other vehicles carrying children. From October 1 2015 it is against the law to smoke in a private vehicle if there’s a young person under-18 present.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

 

Paan, bidi and shisha

Tobacco that you don’t smoke (including paan, betel quid and chewing tobacco) is not a 'safe' way to use tobacco. It causes cancer and can be as addictive as smoking. Find out the risks and how you can quit.

Chewing tobacco and cancer risk

Betel quid, paan or gutkha is a mixture of ingredients, including betel nut (also called areca nut), herbs, spices and often tobacco, wrapped in a betel leaf. Chewing smokeless tobacco, such as paan or gutkha, is popular with many people from south Asian communities, but all forms of tobacco can harm your health. Research has shown that using smokeless tobacco raises the risk of mouth cancer and oesophageal cancer. Studies have also found that betel itself can raise the risk of cancer, so chewing betel quid without tobacco is still harmful.

Cigarettes, bidi and shisha

Smoking increases your risk of cancerheart disease and respiratory problems. This is true whether you smoke cigarettes, bidi (thin cigarettes of tobacco wrapped in brown tendu leaf) or shisha (also known as a water pipe or hookah). A World Health Organization study has suggested that during one session on a water pipe (around 20 to 80 minutes) a person can inhale the same amount of smoke as a cigarette smoker consuming 100 or more cigarettes.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

How quickly you will notice the benefits when you quit smoking

Stopping smoking can make a drastic improvement to your lifestyle and health in ways you might not expect. Once you stop smoking, some of the benefits are immediate and some are longer-term.

After 20 minutes

Pulse rate returns to normal.

After 8 hours

Nicotine and carbon monoxide levels in blood reduce by more than half and oxygen levels return to normal.

After 48 hours

Carbon monoxide will be eliminated from the body. Lungs start to clear out mucus and other smoking debris.

After 48 hours

There is no nicotine in the body. Ability to taste and smell is improved.

After 72 hours

Breathing becomes easier. Bronchial tubes begin to relax and energy levels increase.

After 2-12 weeks

Your circulation improves.

After 3-9 months

Coughs, wheezing and breathing problems improve as lung function increases by up to 10%.

After 1 year

Risk of heart disease is about half compared with a person who is still smoking.

After 10 years

Risk of lung cancer falls to half that of a smoker.

After 15 years

Risk of heart attack falls to the same as someone who has never smoked.

Also....

  • You will save money - the average smoker has 13 cigarettes a day, which works out as 364 cigarettes a month. That's £141 a month and £1,696 a year that you could be saving by not smoking. Use our cost calculator to work out how much you could save
  • Your sense of taste will return and you will enjoy the taste of food more.
  • Your breathing and general fitness will improve.
  • The appearance of your skin and teeth will improve.
  • You'll be more confident in social situations because you won't smell of stale smoke any more.
  • Your fertility levels will improve, along with your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and baby.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

  

Key times to quit smoking

Research shows that most smokers get motivated to quit very suddenly, spurred into action by a specific event, milestone or resolution.

Stop smoking in October

Why quit? Did you know that if you stop smoking for 28 days you're five times more likely to stop for good? Stoptober is the biggest stop smoking event of the year. Why not join all the people who have succeeded in becoming smokefree and join in this year's challenge.

New Year's stop smoking resolution

Why quit? Around seven million of us will make a New Year's resolution to improve an aspect of our health and stopping smoking is one of the most common ones. 

Stop smoking if you are pregnant

Why quit? If you are thinking about having a baby - or you're already pregnant - you have two big reasons to stop smoking. Both you and your baby will be healthier and you will be less likely to have problems during the birth.

Stop smoking on No Smoking Day

Why quit? Every year around a million smokers, especially women, use No Smoking Day to try to quit. The British Heart Foundation charity estimates that more than 1.5 million smokers have quit for good since its launch in 1983, that's more than 45,000 every year.

Quit when you want to get fit

Why quit? Maybe you've decided to start an exercise programme or take up a new sport, and you've noticed how smoking-related symptoms, like shortness of breath, affect you when you exercise.

Smoking can dramatically reduce your endurance meaning that your will take longer to recover after exercise. But as soon as you quit, you'll find that you feel fitter, less breathless and better able to play sports.

Quit when you become a grandparent

Why quit? You probably want to spend as much time with your new grandchild as possible, and if you smoke you could be harming the baby's health. Consider how your son or daughter may feel about you smoking around their baby.

Children who breathe in secondhand smoke are at more risk of serious conditions including allergies, asthma, chest infections and breathing problems.

Going into hospital 

Why quit? Because hospitals are in the business of making people well, many of them don't allow smoking on their grounds at all.

Seeing a stay in hospital as an opportunity to stop smoking for good is a far more positive step than going there feeling angry that you won't be able to smoke.

If you're having an operation, there's the added incentive that if you stop smoking before you go into hospital you'll recover more quickly and there will be less chance of complications.

 

Want to quit smoking?

Contact Peterborough Healthy Lifestyles service on freephone 0800 376 56 55.
Did you know that you're up to four times more likely to quit successfully with their expert help and advice? 

 

Stop Smoking Testimonials

Amanda

 

 

Elaine

"Its now been just over 3 months since I smoked my last cigarette. I'm amazed by how easy I found it with the help and support of Elaine both in person and at the end of the phone, especially as I really enjoyed smoking.

Within this time I've also moved home and it’s been great having the money available to spend on decorating now that I don't have to pay for cigarettes. Its surprised me just by how much I used to spend without realising!

I love the fact that my clothes and hair no longer smell of smoke and I feel quite happy to stand in a lift at work with my colleagues now and not being on the receiving end of a disapproving stare because of the lift being consumed with the horrible stench of smoke. My health has improved dramatically and the annoying cough I has vanished.

I know some people may find this a cliché but if I can quit smoking anyone can........people just need to give it a try and see how they get on and like me surprised by the results but it’s worth a go!"

 

 

Shaun's quit smoking journey

Shaun, aged 58, started his first quit attempt with our 1-1 service in December 2016 having smoked for 40 years. He had started smoking as 12-year-old boy.

Shaun had been advised by his GP that he should stop smoking as he developed very poor circulation in his foot and lower leg caused by a painful condition known as intermittent claudication. 

This is where the blood vessel (artery) to the foot becomes hardened and narrowed so that blood cannot flow through properly. The pain comes on after walking a short distance and now is so bad Shaun walks with a stick and is not able to work. 

Shaun understood that smoking constricts the blood vessels and agreed with the doctor that he should stop smoking although he really did not want to. He was offered daytime or evening/weekend appointments, but decided daytime appointments at his local GP surgery would be best for him.

At the Smoking Cessation Clinic at his local GP surgery, Shaun told his Wellness Coach that he had tried patches and an inhalator before and had not managed to quit.  He asked if he could try Champix tablets and after a discussion about his health and the medication he was on it was agreed by his GP that Shaun could start Champix on an NHS prescription for an initial two week course.

At this point Shaun was smoking about 20 cigarettes a day and his Carbon Monoxide reading was 20 parts per million which indicated he was a seriously addicted smoker with almost 4% of poisonous carbon monoxide in his bloodstream. 

The Champix course allows you to still smoke in the first couple of weeks of treatment but Shaun planned his quit date to be on day seven, which although was a bit early, was a significant date for him. It was New Year’s Eve. A good time for a resolution. 

At the next visit he said he had had a bit of nausea in the mornings so was advised to ensure he had some food before taking his tablet. This he found, really helped. He was still having a lot of cravings and the advisor discussed distraction techniques with him. For example, if thoughts of smoking entered his head it was suggested he does something else like having a drink of water or going outside for a breath of air. This should help take his mind off smoking. 

By the end of the second week, Shaun’s CO reading was down to two parts per million (down from 20) which is in the range of a non-smoker. This was a real achievement, to go from being an addicted smoker of 40 years to a non-smoker in two weeks.

Shaun continued to attend clinic every two weeks and did not smoke again, but continued to have very strong cravings. This is quite unusual for those taking Champix. He was pleased to be able to say though, that even when offered cigarettes by friends he could say: "No thank you, I don’t smoke now." 

Shaun found his quit attempt very difficult as he was suffering a lot pain. The fact he did not really want to stop smoking added to the stress. Many people would have not chosen this time to quit, however Shaun was determined to do it for the sake of his health. The doctor had warned him he may lose his leg or have a heart attack or stroke if he continued to smoke. 

By week eight, the stress in his life reduced somewhat and the cravings became fewer and easier to manage. 

At week 10 we agreed to start to reduce the dose of Champix gradually, without the cravings increasing. 

Now nine months later Shaun is still smoke free and regards himself as a non-smoker. He still has some cravings, but they are now mild and much easier to dismiss from his mind.

Shaun said that most of his cravings were brought on with stress or boredom and through his life his natural reaction was to have a cigarette at those times. Smoking to him was a way of life.

He said that he found the Smoking Cessation Service helpful as there was someone there to listen to him each week. When he was struggling not to smoke again he felt encouraged to persevere. He said he was made to feel good that he had achieved another day without smoking and felt the combination of the medication and the support really helped him. 

Shaun was pleased the Smoking Cessation sessions felt informal even though in a clinic situation and this helped relieve some of his stress. He said it feels excellent to be able to claim he is a non-smoker.

Shaun is hoping his circulation will improve enough to avoid having his leg amputated and is certain he will not smoke again. 

He believes that smoking may have caused the painful condition in his leg and foot. He is trying to walk a little further each day to try to improve his circulation, reduce his pain and improve his quality of life. 

Changing behaviour for anyone is difficult. Quitting smoking is much easier when you want to stop and can chose the best time for you to do it. Shaun succeeded despite very difficult circumstances due to his determination and the support of the Peterborough Smoking Cessation Service. 

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