Feb-Mar 2018

Healthy Peterborough

Vaccination schedule

The planner shows you what vaccinations your child needs. It shows when they should have had them, so you can check they did, and when they are due to have future vaccinations.

Age

Vaccine

Description

Link to more information

8 weeks

1st: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) 

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 months old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

More information

8 weeks

1st: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children when they are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

More information

8 weeks

1st: rotavirus

This is an oral vaccine given to children who are 8 and 12 weeks old. It protects against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness.

More information

8 weeks

1st: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months old. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.

More information

12 weeks

2nd: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 weeks old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

More information

12 weeks

1st: Men C

This is the Men C vaccine, and is given to children when they are 12 weeks old, with a dose of the combined Hib/Men C vaccine given at 12 months old. The vaccine protects against meningococcal (Men) group C, a type of bacteria that can cause meningitis and septicaemia.

More information

12 weeks

2nd: rotavirus

This is an oral vaccine given to children who are 8 and 12 weeks old. It protects against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness.

More information

16 weeks

3rd: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio and Hib

This is the 5-in-1 vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8, 12 and 16 weeks old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae.

More information

16 weeks

2nd: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children who are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

More information

16 weeks

2nd: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months old. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.

More information

12 - 13 months

Booster: Hib and Men C

This is the Hib/MenC booster vaccine, and is given to children when they are between 12 and 13 months old. The booster vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningococcal group C bacteria, which can cause meningitis and septicaemia.

More information

12 - 13 months

1st: measles, mumps and rubella

This is the MMR vaccine, and is given to children when they are between 12 and 13 months and old, and at 40 months old. It protects against measles, mumps and rubella. 

More information

12 - 13 months

Booster: pneumococcal infection

This is the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), and is given to children who are 8 and 16 weeks old, and between 12 and 13 months old. It protects against pneumococcal infection, which can cause diseases such as pneumonia, septicaemia and meningitis.

More information

12 - 13 months

Booster: Men B

This is the Men B vaccine, and is given to children when they are 8 weeks, 16 weeks and 12 months. It protects against infection from meningococcal (Men) group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children.

More information

2 & 3 years

Annual: children's flu vaccine

This is an annual nasal spray vaccine for two-, three- and four-year-olds, plus children in school years one and two, as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

More information

3 years

4 months

Booster: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio

This is the 4-in-1 booster vaccine given to children around the age of three years and four months old. It protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio.

More information

3 years

4 months

2nd: measles, mumps and rubella

This is the MMR vaccine given to children between 12 and 13 months old, and around three years and four months old. It provides protection against measles, mumps and rubella.

More information

4, 5 & 6 years

Annual: children's flu vaccine

This is an annual nasal spray vaccine for two-, three- and four-year-olds, plus children in school years one and two, as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

More information

12 - 13 years

1st: human papillomavirus (HPV)

This is the HPV vaccine. Two doses are given 6-12 months apart to girls who are between the ages of 12 and 13. It protects against four strains of human papillomavirus (HPV): strains 16 and 18, which cause cervical cancer, and strains 6 and 11, which cause genital warts.

More information

13 - 18 years

Booster: diphtheria, tetanus and polio

This is the 3-in-1 booster vaccine given to young people aged between 13 and 18 years old. It tops up the protection against tetanus, diphtheria and polio.

More information

13 - 18 years

1st: Men ACWY

This is the Men ACWY vaccine given to children aged between 13 and 18 years old. It protects against four different causes of meningitis and septicaemia – meningococcal (Men) A, C, W and Y diseases.

More information

 

  

8 weeks
12 weeks
16 weeks
1 year
2 years
   

 

 

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Healthy Peterborough is led by:
  • Peterborough City Council
  • Peterborough Pharmacies
  • Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust